Translate

Getting to know Baklava from Turkey


www.mochferrydc.site

Several sheets of thin filo pastry dough are stacked on top of each other. Pastry dough is made from a mixture of flour, water, oil, vinegar, and egg yolks. Between the sheets is stuffed with chopped nuts. Pistachios, walnuts, peanuts, or cashews are usually an option.

If not nuts, can also be filled with dates, grated coconut, or sesame. As a sweetener, honey and sugar syrup are sprinkled on top. Then baked to get the crispy texture of the pastry dough earlier.

That's roughly the process of making baklava. Complicated but worth the crunchy taste combined with sweet and savory nuts.

Baklava is a typical Turkish takjil snack during Ramadan. As Michael Krondl, culinary historian, says in Sweet Invention, a History of Dessert, it is an integral part of Turkish culture.


“When you visit a Turkish house, you will most likely be served baklava. No wedding ceremony or circumcision would be complete without dessert. During Ramadan, you can look forward to baklava at iftar,” wrote Krondl.


The history of baklava creation is long. Several cultural groups claim their country as the birthplace of baklava. Middle Eastern, Eastern Mediterranean, Balkan, Turkish, Arab, Jewish, Greek, Armenian and Bulgarian introduce baklava as their national dessert. Not surprising considering all of these areas were once part of the Ottoman Empire.


Origins of Baklava

Tarun Kapoor, an American chef, believes that developments in the Middle East and Near East have influenced the taste of baklava more or less. The recipes are constantly being modified and changed according to people's food preferences and eating habits.


“This region has seen many of the world's oldest cultures and civilizations come and go, each modifying baklava to their liking,” Kapoor wrote in the Gulf Times.


According to Kapoor, the Greeks played a role in the technique of making the thin dough that makes up the layers of baklava. Armenian traders on the spice and silk route on the eastern border of the Ottoman Empire, then added cinnamon and cloves to baklava. Further east, the Arabs introduced rosewater and orange blossom water.

The origin of the name baklava also has many versions. The word baklava became known in English in 1650. It was borrowed from the Ottoman Turkish.


“Turkish historians claim its origin from Turkey while others say baklava may have come from the Mongolian word, bayla, which means to bind or wrap,” explains Kapoor.


While the Armenians insist that the word baklava comes from the Armenian language, namely bakh (Lent) and halvah (sweet).


Snacks at Topkapi Istana Palace

Even so, chefs who worked in the Ottoman court contributed greatly to the refinement of the art of baklava. For more than 500 years the kitchens of the Ottoman palace in Constantinople were the main culinary center of the empire. Baklava recipes continued to be perfected, especially in the 15th century.

According to Krondl, baklava was first recorded by Kaygusuz Abdal, a Turkish mystic and poet who lived in the first half of the 15th century. “Two hundred baklava trays,” the poet noted. It also mentions that some baklavas are made with almonds, while others are made with lentils.

Then there are reports of baklava in the kitchen notebooks of Topkapi Palace from the same period. According to this report baklava was baked at the palace in 1473. This is only 20 years after the Turks captured Constantinople.

The tradition came to be known as the Baklava Procession which continued until 1826, when the Janissary troops were disbanded by Sultan Mahmud II. Even so, baklava is still on the menu in the Sultan's kitchen.

In subsequent developments, baklava became a menu for upper class people to send to friends or neighbors. At that time the influence of the Ottoman Empire began to fade.


Until the 19th century, baklava was still considered a luxury item. Only the rich could eat it, even a century later when the Ottoman Empire ended in 1922. The title of Ottoman sultan was removed. Turkey declared itself a republic on October 29, 1923, when Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (1881–1938), a military officer, founded the independent Republic of Turkey.


"To this day, a very common expression in Turkey is 'I'm not rich enough to eat baklava every day'," Kapoor wrote.


Since baklava is considered an expensive snack, Turks will only bake baklava when there are special occasions, such as religious or weddings.

“Baklava was developed from a simple cake to a dessert that required skill to please dignitaries and the rich,” explains Kapoor.

But now it seems a lot has changed. People can buy parcels filled with baklava with just one click. Even Indonesians don't have to go to Turkey to taste the taste of baklava. “You can buy baklava online at any time,” Kapoor notes.

Getting to know Baklava from Turkey
Getting to know Baklava from Turkey


Post a Comment

26 Comments

  1. Duh tenggerokanku inseciure nih liat makanan turki,,,

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yunias | YIP | Sinau Teknologi
    waduh jadi laper nih belum buka lagi wkwkwk

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yunias | Yunias | Sinau Teknologi
    waduh jadi pingin makanan turki

    ReplyDelete
  4. Kelihatannya kudapan baklava ini enak banget. Sabar.. Sabar.. Masih puasa...

    Yah meski pas buka juga nggak akan bisa dapat makanan ini. Wong di sini nggak ada yang jual baklava. Hehehe

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beli online-nya kemana mas? Di atas saya tidak ketemu info tempat belanja online buklava.

    ReplyDelete
  6. kayaknya enak y🤤
    moga2 aja ada rejeki bisa icip2 makanan turki d negara asalnya😂

    ReplyDelete
  7. baklava, kudapan mahal dan hanya ada di acara khusus ya, pasti memang spesial banget kuliner asal Turki ini ya

    ReplyDelete
  8. Kok penasaran banget ya sama rasanya... jadi pengenn beli.. apalagi ngelihatnya pas puasa gini, makin ngiler deh ah.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Di Indonesia belum ada yg jualan nih keknya 🤔

    ReplyDelete
  10. Kayaknya enak banget jajanan asal turki yang satu ini hehehe...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wah makanan khas Turki ini bikin penasara. Btw, kalau mau beli online dimana, Mas? Sudah ada di mana saja?

    ReplyDelete
  12. auto nyari ke YouTube untuk eksperimen

    ternyata pastrynya khusus, nggak bisa pakai yang ada di supermarket

    atau ada? ...... cari ah, pingin coba bikin baklava, tapi yang rasanya asin

    ReplyDelete
  13. dari fotonya, baklava ini memang kelihatan enak, cocok buat berbuka puasa

    ReplyDelete
  14. Jajanan populer ini yaaa. Pernah makan sekali dioleh-olehin teman. Walau gak dari Turki, tapi buatan Bandung. Wkwkwk. Aku suka.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Luar biasa kalo kita mau membaca sejarah sebuah kuliner yang sudah mendunia. Ada banyak cerita bersejarah yang menarik untuk disimak. Liat foto Baklava sekecil itu aja rasanya ngiler banget. Apalagi kalo motretnya lebih cantik dan ditampilkan lebih besar hahahaha

    ReplyDelete
  16. kuliner turky emang banyak yg menarik ya. baklava ini salah satunya. Sejarah adanya baklava ini juga jelas dan detil sekali. baca tulisan ini jadi nambah wawasan baru nih

    ReplyDelete
  17. kuliner turky emang banyak yg menarik ya. baklava ini salah satunya. Sejarah adanya baklava ini juga jelas dan detil sekali. baca tulisan ini jadi nambah wawasan baru nih

    ReplyDelete
  18. Baklava Asal Turki ini terlihat enak dan sepertinya kandungan gizinya pasti oke ya kak, thanks sudah kubaca...

    ReplyDelete
  19. Enaakk sih Baklava ini
    pernah nyoba sekali pas ada undangan di jw marriott
    maknyus!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Banyak yang mempengaruhi citarasa dari Baklava ini sendiri ya. Ngobrolin sejarah kuliner memang seseru itu. Saya sudah rasakan langsung baklava ini saat berpergian ke Turki bulan Maret lalu. Rasanya memang enak banget apalagi yang ada campuran rasa

    ReplyDelete
  21. wah emang enak ya mas ini, penampakannya saja sudah menggoda selera , pasti rasnaya nggak diragukan lagi

    ReplyDelete
  22. wah di mana ituh online-shop untuk beli baklava yang asli dari Turki?

    ReplyDelete